National Poetry Month: Celebrating June Jordan

 

National Poetry Month: Celebrating June Jordan

Photograph courtesy Schlesinger Library, Radcliffe Institute, Harvard University

For 2017 National Poetry Month, The Center for Black Literature, in partnership with the Center for Law and Social Justice at Medgar Evers College and Brooklyn Public Library, will celebrate the life and works of June Jordan (1936–2002), a poet, playwright, and essayist who was one of the most widely published and highly acclaimed African-American writers of her generation. The program will focus on Jordan’s works, how she represents a life of activism, and the ways today’s artists continue the tradition of literary activism. Poet and literary activist E. Ethelbert Miller and biographer and scholar Valerie Kinloch, author of June Jordan: Her Life and Letters, will participate in a conversation on Jordan’s work and life of activism. Attorney and justice activist Joan Gibbs will join the conversation as a respondent. This event is sponsored by a Humanities New York Action Grant.

 

Thursday, April 20, 2017
6:30 p.m.
Brooklyn Public Library
10 Grand Army Plaza
Brooklyn, NY 11238

Free and Open to the Public.
RSVP below.

 

Subway: 2 or 3 trains to either Brooklyn Museum or Grand Army Plaza stations. “S” Shuttle train to Brooklyn Botanic Garden.

“S” Shuttle train to Brooklyn Botanic Garden.

About June Jordan

Poet, playwright, and essayist Jordan (1936–2002) was one of the most widely published and highly acclaimed African-American writers of her generation. During her career, she produced 27 volumes of poems, essays, libretti, and work for children, June Jordan was also known for her fierce commitment to human rights and progressive political agenda. Jordan engaged the fundamental struggles of her era: over civil rights, women’s rights, and sexual freedom.

A prolific writer across genres, Jordan’s poetry is known for its immediacy and accessibility as well as its interest in identity and the representation of personal, lived experience—her poetry is often deeply autobiographical; Jordan’s work can also be overtly political and often displays a radical, globalized notion of solidarity amongst the world’s marginalized and oppressed. Her volumes include Some Changes (1971), Living Room (1985), and Kissing God Goodbye: Poems 1991-1997 (1997) [Biography excerpted from Poetry Foundation.]

Be the first to comment

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.


*