2015 Summer Schedule- Writers on Writing


 Summer Schedule 2015
Writers on Writing
Tune In This Week
“Writers on Writing” Radio Show

With Dr. Brenda M. Greene, Executive Director of
The Center for Black Literature at Medgar Evers College, CUNY
WNYE 91.5 FM
7 p.m. – 7:30 p.m.

Listen online at www.wmecradio.com

This summer, tune into Writers on Writing (WOW) with Dr. Brenda M. Greene. Listen to interviews with authors of the diaspora. This summer MEC Radio will air both new interviews and favorites from this past year. Enjoy your summer!

July 12, 2015: Buck: A Memoir by MK Asante
Dr. Brenda Greene interviews MK Asante, poet, filmmaker, hip-hop artist, and professor at Morgan State University. Asante is the author of the seminal hip-hop text It’s Bigger than Hip-Hop and the poetry collections Beautiful and Ugly Too and Like Water Coming Off My Back.  He has written a coming-of-age memoir that is brutally honest in its depiction of the life faced by young Black men in urban America.

About the Program
Greene discusses with Asante, his motivation for writing, the impact of hip-hop on writing, and Asante’s journey into literacy.  Asante recounts that he felt compelled to share this story to motivate and educate those who may not realize what struggle is about.  He calls on young people to tell the truth and to work at finding their purpose in life.


July 19, 2015: White Gold by W. B. Garvey
Dr. Brenda Greene interviews W. B. Garvey, a relative of the Jamaican National Hero Marcus Garvey and the author of the critically acclaimed historical novel Panama Fever: Digging Down Gold Mountain.

About the Program
Greene discusses with Garvey, his recent historical novel, White Gold, which tells the story of the Jamaicans and Barbadians who traveled to Panama in search of a better economic life.  Garvey recounts the racism the workers encountered from Europeans and Americans, the Jim Crow laws, the violence and debilitating diseases, and the harsh living conditions. Greene notes that the book is well-researched and a poignant exploration of the interior lives of those who helped to build and maintain the Panama Canal. It also provides an alternative history of the story of the building of the Panama Canal and represents a portrayal of dreams deferred.


July 26, 2015: The Light of the World by Elizabeth Alexander
Dr. Brenda Greene interviews Elizabeth Alexander, the author of six books of poetry, including American Sublime, a finalist for the Pulitzer Prize, and two collections of essays, The Black Interior and Power and Possibility. Her most recent book, The Light of the World: A Memoir, is a compelling memoir of grief, loss and love, written after Alexander’s unexpected loss of her husband of fifteen years.

About the Program
Alexander is a natural storyteller and poet, and she discusses with Greene her loss, her writing process, and the state of African-American literature. Alexander takes the reader on a journey that explores memory and those special moments between her and her husband, Ficre. At points, the memoir is a stream of consciousness as Alexander reflects upon family, culture, parenting, and food.


August 2, 2015: Peniel Joseph — originally aired December 14, 2014
Dr. Brenda Greene interviews W. B. Garvey, a relative of the Jamaican National Hero Marcus Garvey and the author of the critically acclaimed historical novel Panama Fever: Digging Down Gold Mountain.

About the Program
Greene discusses with Garvey, his recent historical novel, White Gold, which tells the story of the Jamaicans and Barbadians who traveled to Panama in search of a better economic life.  Garvey recounts the racism the workers encountered from Europeans and Americans, the Jim Crow laws, the violence and debilitating diseases, and the harsh living conditions. Greene notes that the book is well-researched and a poignant exploration of the interior lives of those who helped to build and maintain the Panama Canal. It also provides an alternative history of the story of the building of the Panama Canal and represents a portrayal of dreams deferred.


August 9, 2015 Michael Eric Dyson — originally aired June 15, 2014
Dr. Greene interviews Michael Eric Dyson, cultural critic, sociologist and minister on race, politics, education and the arts.

About the Program
Dyson reflects on the experiences that led and motivated him to become a public intellectual. As one of the foremost contemporary public intellectuals, whose rhetorical swiftness is legendary, Dyson is a regular commentator on MSNBC, CNN, and NPR. Greene asks him to reflect on the concept of a post-racial versus post-racist society, the role of the musician as a social critic, and the impact of hip hop and youth culture in our society.


August 16, 2014 – Willie Perdomo — originally aired on June 29, 2014
Guest Host Tyehimba Jess interviews poet Willie Perdomo, author of the recently published The Essential Hits of Shorty Bon Bon: Poems.

About the Program
Tyehimba Jess talks with Perdomo about The Essential Hits of Shorty Bon Bon, Perdomo’s latest book of poetry, which imagines the life of a percussionist, rebuilding the landscape of his apprenticeship, love, diaspora, and death. During the interview, Perdomo shares his inspiring, historical, music-filled poems with the radio audience.


August 23, 2015 – Raquel Cepeda — originally aired March 2, 2014
Dr. Greene interviews author Raquel Cepeda about her memoir Bird of Paradise: How I Became Latina. Journalist and filmmaker Raquel Cepeda, who was born in Harlem, New York, to Dominican parents, felt estranged from her family, except for heartfelt memories of her grandparents in the Dominican Republic and her own self-image.

About the Program
Dr. Greene and Cepeda talk about what motivated the author to write her memoir and the courage it took to explore her family history. They also discuss the complexity of identity for Latinas and the impact of hip-hop culture on urban New Yorkers.


August 30, 2015 –Bridgett M. Davis — originally aired February 1, 2015
Dr. Brenda Greene talks with author Bridgett M. Davis about her most recently published book, Into the Go-Slow. Davis’s debut novel, Shifting through Neutral, was a finalist for the 2005 Hurston/Wright Legacy Award. Into the Go-Slow is the story of twenty-one-year-old Angie who is consumed by thoughts of the death of her sister, Ella, who died years earlier in Nigeria. On impulse, Angie travels to Lagos and begins to retrace Ella’s steps and uncovers some harsh truths. Davis’s intimate tale captures the pain of living vicariously and the exhilaration of finding yourself.


September 6, 2015 – Lalita Tademy — originally aired February 8, 2015
Dr. Brenda Greene talks with New York Times best-selling author Lalita Tademy about her new novel Citizens Creek, an evocative story an enslaved man who possesses an extraordinary gift to master languages and buys his freedom after serving as a translator during the American Indian Wars The book follows the life of Cow Tom and his granddaughter, Rose, who sustains his legacy of courage. Greene and Tademy also discuss the extensive research and writing process that Tademy used in creating this work.


Sept. 13, 2015: Naomi Jackson
Guest host Clarence Reynolds talks with author Naomi Jackson about her debut novel “The Star Side of Bird Hill,” a coming-of-age story about two young sisters from Brooklyn, New York, who are sent to live with their grandmother in Barbados. During the conversation, Reynolds and Jackson discuss her journey as a writer, characters in her story-telling, and stories reflected in today’s fiction.


Sept. 20, 2015; Guest Host Clarence V. Reynolds talks with Yvonne Adhiambo Owuor and Binyavanga Wainaina, two authors from Africa participating in the 2015 PEN World Voices Festival of International Literature. Originally aired, May 17, 2015

About the Program
In this program, Clarence V. Reynolds, director at the Center for Black Literature at Medgar Evers College, talks with authors Yvonne Adhiambo Owuor and Binyavanga Wainaina, who are visiting New York as participants in the 11th Annual PEN World Voices Festival of International Literature. The theme of this year’s festival is “On Africa,” and the writers share their thoughts about the future of literature by writers from Africa and from the African diaspora, their personal journeys to becoming a writer, and the wide landscape of African literature.

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